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  • 12PM MPR NEWS PRESENTS
    A forum on the minimum wage featuring DFL State Senator John Marty, University of Michigan economist Mark Perry, and Dan McElroy of Hospitality Minnesota. The minimum wage is a big issue in national and local politics.
    Comment ()
  • 11:20 – University of Minnesota Press deeply regrets the forward notes of Sky Blue Water book

    In September, University of Minnesota Press launched a collection of short stories by Minnesota writers that embodies new cultural and gender narratives for young readers to explore. It was billed as a one of a kind collection of stories, but Sky Blue Water was called out by Shannon Gibney, one of the collection’s authors for its ‘outdated’ ideas on ‘discovery narratives’ included by an editor in the book's introduction. As a result of this complaint, U of M Press recalled and reprinted the book. In a press release the publisher stated, “In addition to the recall and reprint, we are going to examine how this error got by the editorial safeguards we have in place to prevent such inaccuracies from making their way into our published books.”
     
    Discussing the publishing controversy and variety of stories contained in this anthology are Sky Blue Water authors: Shannon Gibney, Marcie Rendon and Kirstin Cronn-Mills.
    Comment ()
  • This page about labor trafficking has a link to the report we're talking about: 
     
    http://www.theadvocatesforhumanrights.org/labortrafficking
     
    Comment ()
  • 11:00 – Does Minnesota have a labor trafficking problem?

    The Advocates for Human Rights released a report that found Minnesota had an increasing number of cases of labor trafficking. As this crime often targets homeless and missing people, undocumented workers and people living in poverty, it’s hard to assess the problem. This summer, a Woodbury resident was prosecuted for labor trafficking offenses. Robin Phillips, Executive Director of The Advocates for Human Rights  discusses the underlying causes of labor trafficking and how we can stop this modern day form of slavery.
    Comment ()
  • 10:30 -- BBC's "Discovery": Reversing Parkinson's

    From BBC:
    "Parkinson’s Disease is one of the major neurodegenerative conditions. Cells die, for reasons not fully understood, causing a reduction in the production of the neurotransmitter, dopamine, and a raft of physical and behavioral problems. Although effective drug treatments are available, they wear off over time and have side effects. The highly individual nature of the condition and variation in its progression also makes dosage difficult. Sue Broom reports on two new approaches that could lead to treatments for Parkinson’s. One potential therapy is to replace the dying cells with new ones. This was tried several decades ago but the results were not promising. The new Transeuro trial of cell therapy hopes to lead to better outcomes. The second approach is to use stem cells. Sue Broom talks to the doctors and patients involved in these trials."
     
     
    Comment ()
  • 10:00 – BBC's "The Inquiry": Is Islamic State finished?

    From BBC:
    "So-called Islamic State is on the run. Caught in a pincer movement in Syria and Iraq, the group has lost large swathes of territory over the past year. With its revenues and numbers of fighters also dwindling, the demise of the caliphate appears all but unavoidable. And yet many caution against writing them off too soon, pointing to the group’s proven ability to change tactics. Already, they have redirected their efforts to launching terrorist operations around the world. And their ideology is still proving an effective recruiting sergeant. "
     
    Comment ()
  • Much of the conversation has focused on Vladimir Putin's continuing influence in global affairs. Here's a related story from today's New York Times:
     
    Comment ()
  • 9:00 – FRIDAY ROUNDTABLE: FOREIGN POLICY

    This is the show where we invite three smart people into the studio for a discussion about the week’s news...or a big idea. Today -- we’re considering the foreign policy challenges that will face the next president. Joining Kerri are:
    Guests:
    Barbara Frey, director of the Human Rights Program at the University of Minnesota
    Nicholas Hayes, University Chair of Critical Thinking at St. John’s University
    Hicham Bou Nassif, professor of Political Science at Carleton College
     
    For you: 
    - Where do you think the next “foreign policy fire” erupt?
    - What are the qualities you think make a president competent and adept in handling foreign challenges?
    - Do you think we can expect innovative and creative thinking on foreign policy from our new president and their team?
     
    Comment below.
    Comment ()
  • Producer's Note for Friday, September 30, 2016

    9 AM MPR NEWS WITH KERRI MILLER

    9:00 – FRIDAY ROUNDTABLE: FOREIGN POLICY

    This is the show where we invite 3 smart people into the studio for a discussion about the week’s news...or a big idea. Today--we’re considering the foreign policy challenges that will face the next president. Joining Kerri are:
    Guests:
    Barbara Frey, director of the Human Rights Program at the University of Minnesota
    Nicholas Hayes, University Chair of Critical Thinking at St. John’s University
    Hicham Bou Nassif, professor of Political Science at Carleton College
     

    10:00 – BBC DOCUMENTARY: ISLAMIC STATE

    "The Inquiry" from the BBC World Service: Is Islamic State Finished?
    From BBC:
    "The so-called Islamic State is on the run. It has lost huge swathes of territory over the past year, and its fighters and revenues are dwindling. This BBC documentary looks at whether the Islamic State is finished."
     

    10:30 -- BBC DOCUMENTARY: REVERSING PARKINSON'S

    "Discovery" from the BBC World Service: Reversing Parkinson's
    From BBC:
    "Parkinson’s Disease is one of the major neurodegenerative conditions. Cells die, for reasons not fully understood, causing a reduction in the production of the neurotransmitter, dopamine, and a raft of physical and behavioral problems. Although effective drug treatments are available, they wear off over time and have side effects. The highly individual nature of the condition and variation in its progression also makes dosage difficult. Sue Broom reports on two new approaches that could lead to treatments for Parkinson’s. One potential therapy is to replace the dying cells with new ones. This was tried several decades ago but the results were not promising. The new Transeuro trial of cell therapy hopes to lead to better outcomes. The second approach is to use stem cells. Sue Broom talks to the doctors and patients involved in these trials.
     

    11AM MPR NEWS WITH TOM WEBER

    11:00 – LABOR TRAFFICKING

    Does Minnesota have a labor trafficking problem?

    The Advocates for Human Rights released a report that found Minnesota has an increasing number of cases of labor trafficking. As this crime often targets homeless and missing people, undocumented workers and people living in poverty, it’s hard to assess the problem.
     
    Robin Phillips, Executive Director of The Advocates for Human Rights  discusses the underlying causes of labor trafficking and how we can stop this modern day form of slavery.

    11:20 – SKY BLUE WATER BOOK

    In September, University of Minnesota Press launched a collection of short stories by Minnesota writers that embodies new cultural and gender narratives for young readers to explore. It was billed as a one of a kind collection of stories, but Sky Blue Water was called out by Shannon Gibney, one of the collection’s authors for its ‘outdated’ ideas on ‘discovery narratives’ included by an editor in the book's introduction. As a result of this complaint, U of M Press recalled and reprinted the book. In a press release the publisher stated, “In addition to the recall and reprint, we are going to examine how this error got by the editorial safeguards we have in place to prevent such inaccuracies from making their way into our published books.”
     
    Discussing the publishing controversy and variety of stories contained in this anthology are Sky Blue Water authors: Shannon Gibney, Marcie Rendon and Kirstin Cronn-Mills.
     

    12PM MPR NEWS PRESENTS

    A forum on the minimum wage featuring DFL State Senator John Marty, University of Michigan economist Mark Perry, and Dan McElroy of Hospitality Minnesota. The minimum wage is a big issue in national and local politics.
    Comment ()
  • IN THE DARK


    At 11:30 we broadcast Episode 4 of "In the Dark,” a podcast reported and produced by APM Reports. The podcast looks at the 27-year investigation into what happened to Jacob Wetterling.
     
    Comment ()
  • Minnesota cops work to make Mogadishu safer

     
    This summer Minnesota federal court found nine young Minnesota men guilty for plotting to join the terror group ISIS in Syria, and this month St Cloud law enforcement agencies are investigating a possible link to ISIS to the St Cloud shopping mall attack---and as the investigation continues, community leaders have expressed that enforcement agencies need to have stronger links to American Somali communities.
     
    Two law enforcers: Chief Harrington, Metro Transit Police and Chief McPhee, Three Rivers Park district police, are making a difference.
     
    Tom Weber talks to Chief Harrington and Chief McPhee about their work with  American Somali communities here and in Mogadishu, and their attempt to assist Somali police in their fight against terrorist groups like al Shabab  recruiting isolated American Somalis.
     
    Guest 1 Chief John Harrington, Metro Transit Police
    Guest 2 Chief Hugo McPhee, Three Rivers Park district police
    Comment ()
    • Related Content

    Dictionary fans might squee: OED adds new words, because YOLO

    A fusty old tome? Fuhgeddaboudit. The Oxford English Dictionary regularly updates to reflect English's evolution. The latest additions include "gender-fluid," "biatch" and a batch of Dahlesque words.
    Comment ()
  • How our slang and language is evolving

     
    There was a time when if you said the word "hepcat" or "happy cabbage" or "fly rink" people would know what you meant.
     
    Try to tell someone today that you're going to order "a pair of drawers" and they won't know you mean 2 cups of coffee. Today on MPR News with Kerri Miller we’ll talk about the evolution of language with University of Minnesota’s Anatoly Liberman.
     
    Guest:   
    Anatoly Liberman is a professor of languages at the University of Minnesota. And the author of many books, including:  "Word Origins & How We Know Them." 
    Comment ()
  • Previously: 

    Whose Side Was She On? 'American Heiress' Revisits Patty Hearst's Kidnapping

    Hearst was abducted in 1974 and then declared allegiance to her captors. Legal expert Jeffrey Toobin does not believe Hearst was brainwashed, but rather, "responded rationally to the circumstances."
    Comment ()
  • A conversation with Jeffery Toobin

     
    Legal analyst and writer Jeffrey Toobin joined Kerri Miller at the Westminster Presbyterian Church for a conversation about "American Heiress," - his book that chronicles the Patty Hearst kidnapping....and all that followed.   
     
    While most of the action happened in California - two influential members of the Symbionese Liberation Army - Camilla Hall and Kathy Soliah both have a strong connection to Minnesota.
    Comment ()
  •  

    Conspicuously invisible: Women of color in university sciences

    Majoring in the sciences can be lonely for women of color at the university level, so some students at the University of Minnesota have united to form a community.
    Comment ()
  • 'Hidden Figures': How black women did the math that put men on the moon

    Back in the days of the Space Race, "computers" were people -- often women -- who performed vital calculations. "Hidden Figures" tells the stories of the women who got some of the first men to space.
    Comment ()
  • The invisibility of black women

     
    Over the summer we asked the audience for books that challenged their perspectives - and they delivered.
     
    Book recommendations poured in, and one that stood out was Mychal Denzel Smith’s Invisible Man Got the Whole World Watching. The book is framed as “A young black man’s education,” but in Kerri Miller’s conversation with him Denzel Smith had some interesting things to say on the invisibility of black women.
     
    He joins Miller again today, along with, president and founder of the Women's Institute for Science, Equity and Race - Rhonda Vonshay Sharpe to talk about the challenges facing black women in America. 

    Guests:
    Mychal Denzel Smith, writer and author of “Invisible Man Got the Whole World Watching: A Young Black Man’s Education”
    Rhonda Vonshay Sharpe, president and founder of the Women's Institute for Science, Equity and Race
     
    If you're a woman of color, do you feel the focus has been on lifting up the men in your community?
     
    Comment here or...
    Call in: 651-227-6000 or 800-242-2828
    Tweet: @KerriMPR
     
    Comment ()
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